Skip to main content
Accessibility

Special Educational Needs Support

Disabled Child in School

All children learn at different rates and many will need a bit of extra help at some point during their time in education. A child has special educational needs (SEN) if he or she has a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made. Special educational provision is when a child needs extra help over and above what is usual. SEN can be in 4 different areas:

  • Cognition and learning e.g. dyslexia
  • Communication and interaction e.g. autism
  • Sensory impairment and/or physical
  • Social, emotional and mental health problems

Some children's special educational needs are clear from a very early age, for others these will emerge as they journey towards adulthood. Some children who have SEN will make sufficient progress so the extra help is no longer needed.

Quality First Teaching and Differentiation

All schools have to follow a broad and balanced curriculum e.g. maintained schools have to follow the National Curriculum and academies/free schools have more flexibility about what to teach. Children make progress at different rates and have different ways in which they learn best. Teachers are expected to use different materials and activities to suit the children they teach. Their lessons are planned to ensure that the children receive ‘Quality First Teaching’. Within this, teachers adapt the lessons for specific children or groups of children. This is known as 'differentiation'. Some children who have difficulties in particular areas or at particular times in their school life will get the help they need through differentiation, without being identified as having special educational needs. However, if the school decides your child has special educational needs and that they should give your child more or different help, they must discuss this with you.

Decisions about what level of help a child should get are based on the progress they are making and what help they are getting already.

SEN support/Graduated Response

The Graduated Approach

Students who continue to face challenges in their learning, despite receiving high-quality teaching, are likely to need additional strategies, or different provision, in order to meet their needs. The SEND Code of Practice states that, for these learners, teachers are required to remove barriers to learning and put effective special educational provision in place through Special Educational Needs (SEN) support. For the SEND Code of Parctice please click here

This SEN support takes the form of a four-part cycle (assess, plan, do, review). Through this cycle, actions are reviewed and refined as understanding of a student’s needs and the support required to help them secure good outcomes increases. This is known as the graduated approach.

  • Assess - using the information gathered on-going, day-to-day assessment to make judgements about the progress a student is making and to alert teachers to any barriers that may be getting in the way of them making comparable progress to their peers.
  • Plan - involves discussing, planning and agreeing what will be put in place as an outcome of the assessment information gathered. The planning should involve the student, parents and staff from the school who know the pupil well (this could be the form tutor, key-worker, SENCO or another member of the SEN team). Where other professionals are working with the child, they should also contribute to planning.
  • Do - The SEND Code of Practice makes it clear that it is the responsibility of class and subject teachers to implement the plan on a day-to-day basis.
  • Review - This will provide an opportunity to focus on the specifics of the support plan and to formally evaluate how successfully the support is meeting the needs of the student and to make adjustments where necessary.

The assess, plan, do, review process is a cycle – the idea being that this process is continual. If the review shows a student has made really good progress, this may mean they no longer require the additional provision made through SEN support. If this is the case, the student is likely to be taken off the SEN record and, instead, will be monitored to ensure progress is sustained through inclusive high-quality teaching. For others, the assess, plan, do, review cycle will continue and targets, strategies and provision will be revisited and refined.


What support can be put in place?

Schools are able to identify if a child has SEN and information from parents can be important in this process. If a child has identified SEN, the school’s Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinator (SENCO) will work with the parent and class teacher to plan what to do. This could be a special programme of work, particular equipment, time with a teaching assistant or teacher individually or in a group. A plan is written e.g. a provision map or as an Individual Education Plan (IEP) and shows support which is ‘additional to or different from’ what other children need. The plan shows the targets your child will be working on and the extra support arranged. The IEP or provision map should be discussed with you and with your child, and be reviewed at an agreed date, often at least twice a year.

At times, school staff need to extend their expertise so they can further understand and meet the child/young person’s needs. This might include:

  • receiving training;
  • asking for advice from SENCOs in other schools;
  • asking for advice from education professionals, e.g. specialist teachers or Educational Psychologists;
  • asking for advice from health or social care professionals who are involved e.g. Speech and Language Therapists.

For more information on SEN in mainstream schools please click here or on the image below:

SEN Support in Mainstream Schools Parents Summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on Standard Universal Provision in Schools please click here or on the image below:


Standard Universal support provision in schools

How to get extra Help

If you are a parent/carer and are worried about how your child is getting on at school, start by talking to their class teacher or form tutor. They may share your worries and you can discuss how to help your child make progress, what extra help can be offered and whether some expert advice is needed. You can also ask to speak to the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO) – the teacher who has overall responsibility for special needs. Every mainstream school has a SENCO. Often it helps to ask for a meeting with the SENCO so you can explain your concerns and discuss what action the school will take.

All mainstream schools have to follow the guidance in the SEND Code of Practice. It is a good idea to put things in writing and keep a record of all your contacts with the school. The headteacher and governing board have overall responsibility for make sure children get a good education, including children with SEN. For te SEND Coe of Practise please click here.


ASK US Nottinghamshire

This service offer free impartial and confidential information, advice and support for parents/carers of children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities. They can offer telephone support but also face to face support can be arranged if appropriate e.g. help with completing certain forms, writing letters and attending school meetings.

Their helpline operates Mon, Weds & Fri 9:00 - 13:00. Tues & Thurs 13:00 - 17:00.

Tel: 0800 121 7772 or email: enquiries@askusnotts.org.uk

Schools and Families Specialist Services (SFSS)

Schools and Families Specialist Services  (SFSS) are a team of specialist teachers and teaching assistants with additional qualifications and extensive experience in working with children and young people with special educational needs aged from 0-19.

 The service comprises of four teams:

  • The Early Years Team (supporting children with special educational needs and disabilities from 0 - 7 years (Key Stage 1)).
  • The Communication and Interaction Team
  • The Cognition and Learning Team
  • The Sensory Team

Their services are aimed at children and young people aged from birth to nineteen with complex special educational needs and/or disabilities, their families and staff in the early years settings and schools they attend.

Specialist teachers and teaching assistants work with children and young people with a range of complex SEND in the home for pre-school children, and/or early years settings. They then provide support to schools for children and young people of statutory age in mainstream education, where the schools are seeking advice, guidance and/or training on making provision to address those complex needs.

They provide specialist assessments and interventions, including services for children and young people who are deaf, visually impaired, autistic, or have cognitive learning difficulties.

They accept direct referrals from parents/carers and professionals for children with complex SEND below school age e.g. from Early Years settings or health visitors.


Contact Details

For Early Years SFSS - 0115 804 1232
For the Communication & Interaction, Cognition & Learning or Sensory Teams - 0115 854 6464

Email: simon.ray@nottscc.gov.uk

For more information please click here

How does Nottinghamshire assist pupils with SEND to access schools and the National Curriculum?

The Accessibility Strategy (also known as the Access Plan) identifies the methods by which Nottinghamshire County Council provides assistance to pupils with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities to access the National Curriculum through a programme of improvement to the physical environment within the County' Schools. 

*A copy of Nottinghamshire's Accessibility Strategy can be accessed by clicking on the icon below. However, please note that the plan is in the process of being finalised and the updated version will be available shortly. 

All mainstream schools in Nottinghamshire are expected to provide support to pupils with Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities from the resources delegated to them as part of their school budget, up to a figure of £6,000. For children and young people whose needs exceed that level of funding, schools are able to apply for additional funding. These requests are moderated by other professionals, including teachers, to ensure consistency in terms of the identification of need and the levels of funding.

For more information on the Accessibilty Strategy please click here or on the image below:

Accessibility Strategy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on the High Needs Funding for Nottighamshire mainstream Schools please click here or on the image below:

High Needs Funding for Nottinghamshire Mainstream Schools

Funding for Special Educational Needs

All mainstream schools in Nottinghamshire are expected to provide support to pupils with Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities from the resources delegated to them as part of their school budget, up to a figure of £6,000. For children and young people whose needs exceed that level of funding, schools are able to apply for additional funding. These requests are moderated by other professionals, including teachers, to ensure consistency in terms of the identification of need and the levels of funding.

In order to support a child with SEN, schools sometimes need to access funding to buy additional resources or to increase their staffing. Nottinghamshire has systems of funding for its schools so that the additional needs of children with SEN can be met quickly.

Headteachers and governors are responsible for deciding how their school funding is spent in order to ensure that children’s needs are met. Additional funding from outside the school which has been given for a particular child must be spent supporting that child.

School settings can:

  • fund additional support from the school budget
  • request Additional Family Needs (AFN) funding, which is held by the  ‘Family of Schools’. All decisions about AFN funding are agreed using specific criteria. This is called ‘moderation’
  • request High Level Needs (HLN) funding from the Local Authority, if the ‘Family of Schools’ agree that the child’s level of need is particularly.

Schools in Nottinghamshire work in groups called ‘Families of schools’. The schools work together to share expertise and continue to develop their professional skills in working with and supporting children with SEN. This is all available at ‘SEN support’ and without an Education Health and Care plan.

For more information on the High Needs Funding for Nottinghamshire mainstream Schools please click here or on the image below:

High Needs Funding for Nottinghamshire Mainstream Schools

Education Health and Care (EHC) needs assessments and EHC plans

If a child/young person has been receiving a high level of ‘SEN Support’ and is still not making satisfactory progress, the Local Authority may be asked to complete an EHC needs assessment. This assessment is undertaken when it may be necessary for a child/young person to have support which is only available with an EHC Plan.

Once the EHC needs assessment is completed, the Local Authority then has the information needed to decide whether an EHC plan is necessary. An EHC plan will be written if this is the only way that the special educational provision can be available. An EHC Plan is a legal document which describes a child or young person’s special educational needs, the support they need, and the outcomes they would like to achieve. An EHC Plan looks at all the needs that a child or young person has within education, health and care. Professionals and the family together consider what outcomes they would like to see for the child or young person and the plan identifies what is needed to achieve those outcomes.

Children/young people with an EHC plan may attend a mainstream school or may attend more specialist settings. There will be a formal ‘annual review’ once a year. At this review the progress is reviewed and one discussion is about whether a different school placement should be requested.

Either the school or you as parent can request an EHC needs assessment. It is asked that, wherever possible, a request for an EHC needs assessment is made by both the school and parent together. This helps the LA make a decision as quickly as possible based on all the available information. The request paperwork supports this joint working between parents and schools.

The new EHC pathway has replaced the former statutory assessment and statement process. For further information on Education, Health and Care Plans including the assessment process and how to apply please click here EHC Plans

Whether you are a county or city resident you can contact the Ask Us Nottinghamshire service for advice and support about working through this process. Ask Us can also help if you are unhappy with a decision, and give initial advice on how to appeal or make use of the local Disagreement Resolution process. For more information about Ask Us please click here

If your child has an Education Health and Care (EHC) Plan

If your child has an EHC plan there will be discussions about options for schools as part of the process. The local authority will consider your preference very carefully. They will agree the request unless it would prevent the efficient education of other children in the school, the school is unsuitable for your child, or if it would not be an effective use of their resources. When your child moves from primary to secondary school, their EHC plan will be amended. This involves the parent stating a preference for a particular school, if they wish to.

If your child does not have an EHC plan but is being assessed for an EHC needs assessment at the point when you need to apply for a school, you should apply for a mainstream school as if the process wasn't taking place. This makes sure that your child does not miss the chance of a place at the mainstream school you would have chosen - you can always discuss any other options later.

For further information on Education, Health and care Plans please here EHC Plans

Choosing a school

Most children with special educational needs go to a local mainstream school. Even children with complex needs may be happily included with the right support. In both Nottingham and Nottinghamshire there are a number of special schools which some parents consider to be the best option for their child.

Parents can nominate up to four mainstream schools they would prefer for their child when they first go to school and when they move schools because of their age e.g. to secondary school. They are not guaranteed their first choice but it helps to apply early and make sure multiple choices are selected. For more information about school admissions click here school admissions

If your child/young person has an Education Health and Care (EHC) Plan, the Local Authority will work with you to identify a school place. Parents have the right to ask for a particular school including mainstream and special schools. The Local Authority will explain how decisions about the school placement is made for children with an EHC plan. School places for a child/young person with an EHC plan are decided by the Integrated Children’s Disability Service. Please click here for more information.


County Residents

If you are a County resident click here to Apply for a school place on the Nottinghamshire County Council website.


City Residents

If you are a City resident please click here for School admissions on the Nottingham City Council website.

Types of school

In Nottingham and Nottinghamshire, all parents can ask for a school place at:

  • Mainstream schools: most children in the county and city are educated in mainstream schools and this includes most children with statements and EHC Plans.
  • Academies (mainstream): Academies are independently managed schools. They are set up by sponsors from business, faith or voluntary groups in partnership with the Department for Education (DfE) and the local authority.
  • Foundation schools: Foundation schools are run by their own governing body, which employs the staff and sets the admissions criteria. Land and buildings are usually owned by the governing body or a charitable foundation.
  • Free Schools: Free Schools are non-profit making,  state-funded schools that can be set up by  a wide range of groups – including charities, universities, businesses, educational groups, teachers or parents

If your child has an EHC plan, you can also ask for other schools, for example:

  • Local authority (maintained) special schools: There are a number of special schools and a number of enhanced resource units in the county and city. These are listed in the Local Offer Some of these schools are now academies.
  • Specialist units: a few mainstream schools have special units or facilities which cater for children with certain types of special needs such as autism, speech and language difficulties, hearing impairment, specific learning difficulties or dyslexia. Children spend some of their time in mainstream classes and some in the unit or facility.
  • Other placements: very occasionally a child is placed in a special school not run by the LA. These schools may be in or out of the area, and may be residential. They are a very expensive option for the LA, and Nottingham or Nottinghamshire schools are always carefully considered. An important consideration is whether the placement is an efficient use of LA resources.
  • Click here to go to the Education section of the Local Offer

Admissions and disability discrimination

Schools cannot refuse to offer a school place because a child/young person has special educational needs. The Equality Act 2010 applies to schools and admissions. There is a school admissions code that all schools and admissions authorities must follow. This also states that schools cannot take into account reports from previous schools about past behaviour, attendance, attitude or achievement and must not discriminate against or disadvantage disabled children and those with special educational needs. 

If you feel your child is being discriminated against for something to do with their disability, you can contact Ask Us Nottinghamshire here for advice, e.g. if you are told they can't start school because they are still in nappies.

Children not in school

There is information available on Notts County Council's website regarding children not in school including elective home education please click here.

If your child is absent  from school due to illness, for more information please click here. There is also information on exclusions from school including fixed period exclusions please click here and permanent exclusions, please click here.

You can also find further information through the frequently asked questions section on children not in school, please click here.


ASK US Nottinghamshire

This service offer free impartial and confidential information, advice and support for parents/carers of children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities. They can offer telephone support but also face to face support can be arranged if appropriate e.g. help with completing certain forms, writing letters and attending school meetings.

Their helpline operates Mon, Weds & Fri 9:00 - 13:00. Tues & Thurs 13:00 - 17:00.

Tel: 0800 121 7772 or email: enquiries@askusnotts.org.uk

 

 

 

Youth Justice and SEN Education

In Nottinghamshire the Youth Justice Service (YJS) have a dedicated education team, who pick up anything that relates to education for young people in the youth justice system.

The team consists of the Senior Education Practitioner, Training & Employment Co-ordinator, 3 Education, Training and Employment Advisers based in each locality team, 1 Functional Skills Tutor, and a Speech, Language and Communication Therapist (who covers the whole service and is shared with Nottingham City Youth Offending Team).

The team carries out the following work with young people with special educational needs (SEN) in the youth justice system:

  • Share all educational information and SEN with the custodial establishments within 5 working days.
  • Should an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP) review be needed whilst in custody, the YJS Education, Employment & Training Advisers will carry this out in the custodial setting on behalf of the Integrated Children's Disability Service (ICDS) and forward all paperwork.
  • YJS Education Training and Employment Advisers liaise with the custody setting to broker support necessary and wherever practicable in a custodial setting.
  • YJS Education, Training and Employment Advisers will receive information on the curriculum (and wherever possible SEN support) that has been followed whilst in custody so that the continuation in education is as smooth as is practical.
  • YJS Education, Training and Employment Advisers will attend the pre-release meeting and may visit the young person to establish educational plans upon release.
  • YJ Education Services will liaise with ICDS or the Fair Access Team to plan and ensure that ALL young people who are of compulsory. education age receive the legal entitlement to education. (Attendance may be part of their release licence, and therefore subject to breach procedures if no satisfactory attendance).
  • All young people will have access to the Employment, Education and Training Adviser who will be available to support young people's post 16 plans including benefits, careers advice etc.
  • Employment, Training and Employment Advisers will be available to give ALL young people detailed advice on disclosure of offences and advocate disclosure information (as and when necessary).
  • At the end of the court order the Employment, Training and Employment Adviser will be able to signpost to other services to continue support.

 

Disagreements and Complaints

All schools, colleges and services will have their own published policies and/or guidance for addressing complaints and disagreements. In the first instance it is always best to discuss issues at the earliest opportunity and this may be an informal chat with your child's teacher or SENCO at school.

If you feel that you are unable to resolve a disagreement there are different processes available depending on the nature of the issue or disagreement and you can access further information on this by clicking here Disagreements and Complaints

Information, Advice and Support Services - Ask Us Nottinghamshire

Information, Advice and Support Services (IASS) offer free, impartial and confidential information, advice and support to disabled children and young people, and those with SEN from birth to 25, and their parents/carers. They are statutory services, which means there has to be a service in every Local Authority. In Nottinghamshire the service if offered by Ask Us. Watch this animation, which explains all of the support on offer from IASS:


Ask Us Nottinghamshire

This service offer free impartial and confidential information, advice and support for parents/carers of children/young people with special educational needs and disabilities including advice on what to look for when choosing a school. They can offer telephone support but also face to face support can be arranged if appropriate e.g. help with completing certain forms, writing letters and attending school meetings.

Their helpline operates Mon, Weds & Fri 9:00 - 13:00. Tues & Thurs 13:00 - 17:00.

Tel: 0800 121 7772 or email: enquiries@askusnotts.org.uk

Education services and support

Here you will find services that support education and also offer educational advice and information, simply click here or on the image.

           Education services tutors and support

Special School Nursing

This service provide nursing support and advice on health issues for children and young people, and their families and carers. They also support the move from children's healthcare to adult healthcare when young people leave school.

The service is available to children and young people who attend a special school in Nottingham City or County from age 3 - 19 years.

The service is open 8:30am – 4:30pm, Monday to Friday all year round.


Accessing the service

If a child or young person attends one of the schools listed below, they receive the special school nursing service:

Ash Lea School

Telephone: 0115 989 3984

 

Beech Academy

Telephone: 01623 491 027

 

Bracken Hill School

Telephone: 01623 491 027

 

Carlton Digby School

Telephone: 0115 883 9122

 

Derrymount Schools

Telephone: 0115 883 1101

 

Fountaindale School

Telephone: 01623 491 027

 

Oak Field School and Sports College

Telephone: 0115 883 5487

 

Orchard School

Telephone: 01636 705 826

 

Redgate School

Telephone: 01623 491 027

 

Sutherland House Family of Schools

Telephone: 0115 989 3984

 

Yeoman Park School

Telephone: 01623 491 027

Referral Guidelines for Paediatric Outpatients from Primary Care

Click here information on Referral Guidelines for Paediatric Outpatients from Primary Care

REFERRAL GUIDELINES FOR PAEDIATRIC OUT–PATIENTS FROM PRIMARY CARE

Find Us on Facebook

Facebook is monitored during office hours Monday - Friday, however if your enquiry is serious, urgent or involves personal details, we advise you to contact the team on 0300 500 80 80 or email: enquiries@nottscc.gov.uk

Follow Us @NottsCC

News

Back to top Powered by Open Objects © Open Objects Software Limited